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I don't think you need to set up anything in your local DNS server, that just resolves local Active Directory DNS requests (or forwards them to an external DNS server, usually that of your ISP, when it can't resolve them itself). You edit the MX records on your external server at the hosting company to point to your Exchange Server's external IP address and Exchange does the rest (once you've done the steps in that guide). Make sure you open the right ports on your router/firewall to allow incoming on port 25.
 

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You're welcome dude. Had to do something in between reboots on this nightmare of a new 2003 Server rebuild I've been doing all day long, it was driving me bonkers [:D] The stuff that has gone wrong, you just couldn't make up! [:p]

First thing to do is find the source of this returned mail, whether it's from your web host's mail server or your Exchange Server. Check the mail header in the returned message, does it give any hint of having passed through an Exchange Server (there should be a trace of the server's host name in there somewhere), if so make sure you have sent your message to a valid user name on Exchange.

I find Outlook Express much easier than Outlook for examining mail headers. Highlight a message, then go to File > Properties then Details tab.
 

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P.S. DNS changes have to propagate around the world's DNS servers, if the DNS of the ISP from which you're sending the test message hasn't yet updated, your test mail will not reach its destination. Give it some time, check again tomorrow.
 
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