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Not on line guides, but a couple of decent books that I have bought:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0321330625/qid=1130501019/sr=8-1/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i1_xgl/202-1621081-0692600

Great book on the latest version of PS, with loads of cool stuff from beginner to pro...

http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0817463003/qid=1130501170/sr=2-1/ref=sr_2_3_1/202-1621081-0692600

Decent book on understanding exposure (surprisingly!!) prob aimed more at SLR users

I also find that Digital Photo mag has some really good stuff for photoshop, with CD guides that run through each process stage by stage, with images supplied, so you can see how close you can get to theirs, before trying it on your own stuff.
 

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I've recently started a course on photography and found the Digital Camera magazine website a great resource.

It's at www.dcmag.co.uk and it has some very good tutorials on such things as lighting, depth of focus, low light photography, portraits, basically a very good starting point! Oh and the magazine isn't bad either.
 

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How to keep dust off your sensor:

1) Switch off before changing lenses so the sensor is not charged.

2) Point the bayonet down because more dust falls than rises

3) Keep rear lens caps, body caps, and rear lens elements clean because this is where most of the dust comes from.

4) If you can find a sheltered location to change lenses.

5) If you can use dust resistant pro grade lenses.
 

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4) If you can find a sheltered location to change lenses.
How about wrapping the camera in a clean, new polythene bag like those you get at the fruit and veg section of a supermarket, while you change lenses? That should cover it up well and protect from dust. I use those bags as disposable gloves for changing halogen light bulbs.
 

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4) If you can find a sheltered location to change lenses.
How about wrapping the camera in a clean, new polythene bag like those you get at the fruit and veg section of a supermarket, while you change lenses? That should cover it up well and protect from dust. I use those bags as disposable gloves for changing halogen light bulbs.
Yes, as long as you make sure the bag itself is dust free! [;)] Statistics show that majority of dust and airbourne particles seem to orginate from bags and lens caps themselves!
 

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I helped our Whiteboy recently on some Night Shooting so I thought you guys may like to hear it too.

Night shots are tough but once you get the hang of it you can get some amazing shots.

if
you're doing it at night or in the day its the amount of light you have
that will determin how you take the photo. With my FujiFilm i have a
manual mode where i can set the shutter speed, the appeture (the F stop
that is) and also dick about with the white balance depending on what
kinda light is around it like sun or bathroom lights etc. I stick that
on auto mostly!

Anyway, night shots. The darker it is the
longer you need to keep the shutter open, that's really it but the
trick is to know what will give you a solid looking picture at the
right exposure. Open the lens for too long and you get waaaaay took
much light, open for too short a time and it'll be dark. You just have
to experiment on how long you need to keep it open for till you get the
right shot. My S20 has a little bar which shows if a shot is over or
under exposed so i can change the time on the shutter speed to get it
just right but you might have to take a shot, move it on one, take it
again and then review which one looks the best.

If you want to
get some cool shots like the fairground ride i took or some car lights
flying past then you might need to think about your appeture too.
basically this is how WIDE or small the lens is. F2.8 is the lowest
setting and lets is the most amount of light. think of your iris in a
dark room. It;s wide open to get all the light in it can. here's an
example:

If you have some low light but every time you keep the
shutter open for say 5 seconds to get a cool lighting effect of a car
going past the scene looks VERY bright. You can compensate for this by
making the iris of your camera smaller (a larger F number) and then
it'll let in less light but over the same amount of time. So if you
went up to F8 or something like that (mine does 2.8 to 11 in 10 steps,
i think) then you can balance out how much light you let into the
camera against how long the shutter is open for.

Hope that makes some sense!

David
 

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To get the best out of my Canon 580ex flash I use it on manual mode along with the camera.

I keep an eye on the shutter speed (I usually do not go faster than 1/125th). Depending on the are being photographed I set the flash to full and then use the apeture to compensate for brightness. In other areas I sometimes wind the flash power down to 1/2 or 1/3rd.

This works for me.
 

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That's a good test. It's amazing how soft the images are even with such a great lens. It would be interesting to do the same with a 1.4x.

Cheers

Tony
 

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I helped our Whiteboy recently on some Night Shooting so I thought you guys may like to hear it too.


If you have some low light but every time you keep the shutter open for say 5 seconds to get a cool lighting effect of a car going past the scene looks VERY bright. You can compensate for this by making the iris of your camera smaller (a larger F number) and then it'll let in less light but over the same amount of time. So if you went up to F8 or something like that (mine does 2.8 to 11 in 10 steps, i think) then you can balance out how much light you let into the camera against how long the shutter is open for.

Hope that makes some sense!

David
Great write up David!
Just wanted to add, that if you have found the aperture (f) and time you want to use in the shot and the picture is to dark, there is always the ISO (sensitivity of the sensor) that you can adjust. Only drawback is more noise in the picture the higher you go. Much of this noise can however be removed with some filtering.<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>

Cheers,<o:p></o:p>
 
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