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Adrian
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4,149 Posts
First of, this is not an easy thing to DIY. I would strongly advise against DIYing these unless you've done other work on your car before, or it may put you off for life! [ :D] It WOULD be easier on a ramp, or to just let a garage do it. But where's the fun in that!?
Last time i did my rear beam bushes, it was to pass the MOT, I'd never done them before, and I fitted them upside down, They still worked okay, and passed the MOT, but not ideal.
This time, a year later, I'm upgrading Seat Leon Cupra R Rear beam bushes, which are solid rubber, and improve handling, without effecting ride quality.
LCR bush part number: V1ML 501 541
Cost for the pair from VW dealership: £120.48 inc VAT
SO lefts get started!
Tool you need:

  • socket set with 13,16,17,18,19mm sockets
  • 16, and 19mm spanner
  • trolley jack
  • axle stand
  • some kind of puller, mine was made up of M12 stud, 2 nuts, some metal plates, and an old front wheel bearing (pictured below).
  • Big hammer
  • flat blade screw drivers you don't mind breaking, preferably with a square/hexagonal shaft, and a striking plate.
  • General tools like pliers etc will also come in handy

The puller:
20130220_131700_zps6c8c3854.jpg

Get the car up in the air, and wheel off, i started with the drivers side
20130220_140245_zpscb2e09b9.jpg

place a jack stand under the rear beam, and lower the car on to it, to compress the spring lightly, so you can remove the rear shock absorber (16mm).

[background=#ff0000]Be careful when lowering the jack, you don't want to drop it hard![/background]

20130220_140819_zpsdaefd023.jpg

With the shock bolt removed, you can jack the car back up, and remove the spring
20130220_141108_zpsdf41d7be.jpg

Then you need to remove the clip, and loosen the bolt holding the brake line flex pipe, above the beam. To give you enough room to drop it, without damaging the brake lines.
20130220_142838-Edit_zpsead52443.jpg

with the brake lines removed, remove the bolt through the bushing, and then the 4 bolts holding the bush mounting bracket. You may be able to do it without removing the bracket, but i did anyway, to get more room to work with.
20130220_141543_zps202d6a92.jpg

20130220_143230_zpse8d5af4e.jpg

To remove the old bush (mine were plastic but the same principal work on metal variants) locate the void in the bush, and drive a flat blade screw driver in between the bush and the rear beam axle like so:
20130220_143815_zpsb319b136.jpg

use a square/hex shaft screwdriver, and twist is, to create a larger gap (and release your otherwise stuck screwdriver!!!)
I then used a larger screwdriver and chisel to make the gap even bigger, then clouted the bush with a club hammer.
20130220_144630_zpsfc17e362.jpg

20130220_144733_zps549d72d3.jpg

Success! that's the hard bit over.
prepare the new bush

20130220_145126_zpse1217917.jpg

Next, clean up, and grease the rear beam:
20130220_182212_zps0cac8d43.jpg

Silicon grease works well
20130220_151529_zps9b01873a.jpg

Then grab your puller, be it barn yard door like mine, or the 'proper' tool.
20130220_152024_zps9233618c.jpg

Getting it started can be a little tricky, with it trying to go in wonky, but the LCR bushes are nicely tapered, and the plastic deforms, so they will soon straighten up.
The bushes i had previously benefited from being filed down slightly, to help get them started.
you can get to this point using a flat plate:
20130220_152840_zps304a6975.jpg

Then grab yourself a handy (half of a) wheel bearing, and pop it in the mix:
20130220_153532_zpsf9148abf.jpg

This works well, but not quite enough, an extra 5mm is needed, my solution, was 2 metal plates:
20130220_154148_zpsf6d17377.jpg

Tadah:
20130220_154421_zps0ecc5f2f.jpg

You can then re-fit the bracket, and bolt it back up (don't forget the thread lock!)
20130220_155426_zps64150802.jpg

20130220_164831_zps797a8ef0.jpg

[H]
Very similar process for the passenger side, but the brake line goes through a plat attached to the bush bracket, there is therefore, not much point removing it, just pop the two clips off to free up the flex line.
20130220_175353_zps9df91449.jpg

You should be able to then drop it down like this:
20130220_175336_zps85bf42f7.jpg

To line the bush back up, lower the car slowly on the jack, with an axle stand under the rear beam like this:
20130220_192840_zpsd747dff1.jpg

Again, be very careful when lowering the car, take it slowly.
use a screw driver to line the bush up with he bracket so you can insert the bolt
20130220_192810_zps54854008.jpg

And that's it, you're all done!
20130220_201739_zpsa6b45fed.jpg

I did this very leisurely, taking lots of pictures in the process, and it took me 8 hours. I would advise setting aside a whole day to do this job if you've not done it before.
Good luck!
 

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Guttersnipe
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1,138 Posts
Fantastic guide Adrian [:D]

I'll be doing this myself as soon as it's a bit warmer. However my plan is to just remove the entire axle though, Maybe clean and paint it at the same time.
 

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Adrian
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4,149 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Cheers Stu [Y]

It wouldn't be a bad idea to drop the rear axle, and i have a pressure bleeder, so bleeding the brakes afterwards is no problem. It would probably be easier overall.

However, it's defiantly possible to do without removing the rear beam, and for anyone a bit intimidated by the thought of dropping the beam and bleeding the brakes, this is an alternative.

I couldn't find any definitive guide when i was looking, just a handful of threads on rear bushes, so thought id write my first proper how to on them [:)]

Good luck when you do yours, and good shout on waiting for better weather! its bloody cold out there! especially when i already have a cold [+o(]
 

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Guttersnipe
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1,138 Posts
Aye i'll be fitting new brakes + splash guards at the same time so it should simplify things. Only problem is I don't know if it's possible to remove the rear beam on my own with the car on axle stands. Any idea how much it weighs?
 

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Adrian
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4,149 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Aye i'll be fitting new brakes + splash guards at the same time so it should simplify things. Only problem is I don't know if it's possible to remove the rear beam on my own with the car on axle stands. Any idea how much it weighs?
If you remove the brakes prior to dropping the beam, it would help. id guess it weightls somewhere between 20-30kg should be manageable on your own, but easier with assistance, i imagine.

Dont forget you'll need new wheel bearings if you're taking the hubs off (to swap the splash guard).

So can we expect to see a 'how to' via removing the beam? [;)]
 

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Guttersnipe
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1,138 Posts
I've been studying NooNoo's guide which shows the bearings being split and reassembled. I'll ask the dealers to keep a new set in stock just in case.

Haha i'm planning to do several 'how to's' during my suspension overhaul. Providing I've got any skin left on my fingers [;)]
 

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Registered
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613 Posts
Hi, I'm planning on doing this to my car gt tdi 115 and was wondering if I needed the spring compressors at all?

I will be doing the front sway bar bushes and the front struts too as I know I've got rubbish handling compared to another golf gt tdi 150.

is that all the rubbers that are replaceable for the handling?

and last but not least what's the difference between normal oem bushes and the cupra r ones? Bearing in mind I have a 5 door.

Thanks
 

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Adrian
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4,149 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
[quote user="MikeyGolfgt"]

Hi, I'm planning on doing this to my car gt tdi 115 and was wondering if I needed the spring compressors at all?

[/quote]

You dont need spring compressors to change the rear beam bushes, no.

[quote user="MikeyGolfgt"]

I will be doing the front sway bar bushes and the front struts too
as I know I've got rubbish handling compared to another golf gt tdi 150.

[/quote]

ARB bushes usually create a knocking noise, the effect on handling is minimal, but still a good idea to change worn parts. Shock absorbers will make a big difference.

[quote user="MikeyGolfgt"]

is that all the rubbers that are replaceable for the handling?

[/quote]

No. Lower control arm bushes are an integral part of the suspension. If these are worn the handling will be spongy, and may pull to one side under acceleration/braking. Best bet is to replace them with Audi TT bushes. See my V5 build for pictures. New top mounts and bearings when you change the struts wouldn't be a bad shout, either.

[/quote]

and last but not least what's the difference between normal oem bushes and the cupra r ones? Bearing in mind I have a 5 door.

[quote user="MikeyGolfgt"]

LCR bushes are solid rubber and reduce lateral 'give' in the beam, making the handling tighter. They are less prone to wear than the voided bushes. OEM bushes are voided, which makes them mechanically weaker, and obviously offer more play in the rear beam.
 

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Boss
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1,287 Posts
Something to note that to check the type of bushing that is in there as it makes it a million times harder if it has the older Rubber hydraulic ones in there that have a metal housing around the outside opposed to the above plastic ones that shift fairly easily, if you have the metal type you will probably need to remove the beam to get them out or use an air hammer
 

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Adrian
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4,149 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Something to note that to check the type of bushing that is in there as it makes it a million times harder if it has the older Rubber hydraulic ones in there that have a metal housing around the outside opposed to the above plastic ones that shift fairly easily, if you have the metal type you will probably need to remove the beam to get them out or use an air hammer
the OEM bushes i took out last year were metal, and i did it in exactly the same method. Granted, it was a little harder, but it works just the same.

Posted Image
 

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Registered
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613 Posts
Hi thanks for your replies,

i want to change all the rubbers: rear top strut, front top strut, arb bushes, wishbone bushes, rear beam bushes.

i know this is crazy but my car handling is pants at the moment also 133k on standard rubbers is quite daunting.

currently I've got noted down wishbones get tt bushes, Cupra r for rear beam. And I guess oem for the rest? Or am I missing something out?

sorry I'm not too clued up about the rubbers that need replacing u see.
 

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419 Posts
Thats a good guide, I dont mean to be critical but just to bring to attention, these bushings have to be aligned in a specific way when fitting, the indentation tab on the bush has to line up with the edge of the rear arm. Are ye aware of that, most bushings to have a certain orientation for fitting but a lot of people seem to just bang them in any way in general.
 

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Adrian
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4,149 Posts
Thats a good guide, I dont mean to be critical but just to bring to attention, these bushings have to be aligned in a specific way when fitting, the indentation tab on the bush has to line up with the edge of the rear arm. Are ye aware of that, most bushings to have a certain orientation for fitting but a lot of people seem to just bang them in any way in general.
I am aware of this, and is the main reason i was replacing them (again) in the first place. I looked up the orientation when i first did them, and thought i had it right, but after pressing them in, i realised it was wrong. It was too much hassle to re-do it, so i left it like it, and it drove fine like that for about a year.

The second time round, however, i fitted Leon Cupra R bushes (as this guide is titled) and they do not have an orientation, because they are solid rubber, and not voided.

But you're quite right, if anyone is reading this guide to fit standard bushes, they should be aware the orientation of the bush should be observed. The pictures of my old bushes above are fitted incorrectly.
 
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