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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well the car did...

A good clean with Johnson's baby shampoo...

Claybar and lube[:O]

Another good clean with Johnson's shampoo..

Used the Porter cable..

SSR 2..

Clearcote Vanilla moose Hand Glaze

Megs NXT Tech Wax

Finish with a coat of P21S..

Took all day. Need to do the tyres tho[:(] May be tomorrow..

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Then give the old girl a wash too[:O]

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Opinions please?? Good or Bad i can take it..... Sorry about the yard pics, couldnt be bothered to go for a run. loll
 

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Clearcote Vanilla moose Hand Glaze

Megs NXT Tech Wax

Finish with a coat of P21S..
I sometimes wonder about the order people put stuff on, one example I've seen is polish, glaze, then polish again [^o)] (polishing off the glaze?), I see you've waxed on top of your glaze... I always thought the glaze goes on top of the wax? Certainly the case with two different products I've used (Autoglym and Turtle Wax - their glazes go on last).

Anyway, looks well shiny [Y] Hope you took the wheels off and scrubbed inside the arches [:)]

[;)]
 

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I always thought the glaze goes on top of
the wax? Certainly the case with two different products I've used
(Autoglym and Turtle Wax - their glazes go on last).
'Glazes' are typically used at automotive
manufacturing plants and by paint and body shops on freshly painted
surfaces. Their primary function is to improve the brilliance and
clarity of the paint. They may contain fillers to hide very minor
imperfections (swirls) and may or may not offer any protective
qualities. Glazes revitalize the look of all paint finishes through
oils and 'wetting agents'. Glazes are almost always body-shop safe
which means they do not contain any silicones.


After
a vehicle is painted or touched up it may be compounded to remove minor
defects, polished to remove compounding haze or surface dullness and a
glaze applied to create a uniform, deep, 'wet' shine before it is
delivered to the consumer. Because glazes tend to create a 'wet-look'
shine they have come to be used by enthusiasts to maximize shine on
show cars, historic and exotic vehicles and even daily drivers.


Glazing
does not replace polishing with a polish. A vehicle should always be
polished first, a glaze applied and usually finished with some type of
wax or paint sealant (on cured paint).


Some info off The Polishing Co.
 

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Great job - very black 'n' glassy result.

Still can't get my head round this Johnson's Baby Shampoo nonsense lol - gonna give it a try though. I wonder if Dove products are any good.
Dove producsts!? LOL you fool...try cif for removing scratches though [:D]

Anyway, looks the dogs knackers!

Thinking about it, dogs knackeres dont look to good, so looks the cats ...... [:p]
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Cheers guys, didnt know what i was doing but it did end up looking good...Better than when i picked it up..

Still not sure if it's the right way to detail it... Oxford, Jase, Martyn???

sadsack, bambino????

Anytime mate, leave the car here and take mine... Not for work though, mileage you do loll
 

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After a vehicle is painted or touched up it may be compounded to remove minor defects, polished to remove compounding haze or surface dullness and a glaze applied to create a uniform, deep, 'wet' shine before it is delivered to the consumer. Because glazes tend to create a 'wet-look' shine they have come to be used by enthusiasts to maximize shine on show cars, historic and exotic vehicles and even daily drivers.

Glazing does not replace polishing with a polish. A vehicle should always be polished first, a glaze applied and usually finished with some type of wax or paint sealant (on cured paint).
Hmm, it would seem silly to wax on top of something that gives the wet look. I've always found my shine to be better after applying glaze over the wax, as per the instructions (so, Turtle Wax Gloss Guard on top of Turtle Wax, erm, wax) but have never done it the other way, simply because that's not how the manufacturer says to use it. I always understood wax to be the tough, protective barrier (after polish which cleanses) and the glaze to be the icing. I currently use Autoglym Extra Gloss Protection glaze as my last treatment as it says on the bottle and it works a treat. In fact I just washed a small patch of my bonnet with water and just buffed it with a microfibre cloth and it looked and felt just-waxed. Ah, sod it, I'll just scrub her with a wire brush next time [:D]
 

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Some good stuff, this is how I try to do it: I always wax over glaze

http://www.bettercarcare.com/articles.php?articleId=28&page=1

<o:p> </o:p>

<o:p> </o:p>

SIX REQUIREMENTS

The perfect shine comes when your car's paint finish is in good condition, free
of surface contamination, polished, glazed, protected and waxed. Let's
look at each of these requirements individually.

Good Paint Condition

For the first 12 to 18 months of a new car's life, the paint is relatively
oxidation-free and in good condition. If you maintain your new car's
paint with regular washing and protection, oxidation will remain minimal, and
cleaning the paint will be a minor task. At a minimum, you should wash
your car weekly. If you don't have time to wash weekly, use my Quick
Detailing? process.

Contamination-free

As you drive your car, debris from the road (i.e., tar, oil, bugs, etc.) will
lodge itself on your car's paint. The longer this debris is allowed to
remain, the more difficult it is to remove. This is just one reason that
regular washing is so important. While outside, your car will also
collect other contamination. (Birds, bugs and neighborhood kids seem to
have a natural attraction to beautiful cars.) These contaminants must be
removed; you can't wax over them and expect to get a show car finish.

Polished

Polishing is necessary to remove minor blemishes, including surface
scratches, swirl marks, pitted areas (minor road stone nicks) and scuffs.
When polished, the paint finish will feel perfectly smooth. Your hand and
polishing towel will literally glide over the surface. Feeling a
perfectly polished car is a stimulating experience for most car nuts.
There's nothing quite like the polished fenders of a curvaceous Porsche,
Ferrari, Viper or Corvette.

Glazed

Glaze is a term that's grossly misused in detailing products. Glazes are
paint treatments used to fill small surface scratches and swirl marks. To
a painter, glaze is the term used to describe the process of restoring full
paint gloss. In The Perfect Shine?, ultra-fine polishes are used to
refine the paint finish to achieve or restore full gloss.

Protected

Paint is protected when it's sealed from the elements. As we've discussed
in previous chapters, synthetic sealants offer the best protection. Synthetic
coatings are five to ten times more durable than the carnauba waxes. They
offer extended protection from the elements and create a super slick
surface. In The Perfect Shine? process, the synthetic protection is an
acrylic sealant. I have not found a polymer sealant that works. I
will explain why later.

Waxed

Waxing is the final step of The Perfect Shine. We're not talking just any
wax here; we're talking about a pure, natural carnauba wax. Pure carnauba
waxes don't have cleaning properties or synthetic compounds added. They
are made from a blend of carnauba waxes, beeswax and natural oils. A
quality show car wax gives paint depth and warmth. I know, I know, it
sounds like we're talking about a fine wine or something. Just don't
underestimate the value of a great show car wax when it comes to the final
results of your car's finish. Now that you know the six requirements for
The Perfect Shine, I'll share with you my personal tips that keep my cars
turning heads. The first thing to know is that I treat my toys
differently than my daily driver. It's very difficult to maintain a
perfect shine on a daily driver, unless you only drive it a mile or two a
day. Show cars (toys) are easier, because their job is to stay beautiful.

THE PERFECT SHINE

The Perfect Shine is a simple process that reliably achieves the best shine
possible on any paint finish.
 
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