Volkswagen Mark IV Forum banner
1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,100 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As title suggests, I decided to pull all the wheels off, and clean up the calipers at the weekend.although the Monza's are easy to clean, I couldn't get to the whole caliper with the wheels on.

Posted Image


Out came the Zymol

Posted Image


Wheel bolts were bone dry and felt under torqued, the handbook quotes 120nm, mine felt like half that.

Posted Image


So out came the copper grease and the torque wrench.

Posted Image


Time to start putting things back together

Posted Image


Posted Image


Posted Image


As I get a few emails from our Friends over the pond asking for spring paint codes, I thought I'd include a couple of photo's.

Fronts of course.

Posted Image


And rears.

Posted Image


Back together, and time for a beer, after road test of course.

Posted Image
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Looking very good, although I agree the Monza II's are easy to clean even while on the car for the most part. I suspect the same can't be said of the R32's wheels.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
189 Posts
The torque figure 120Nm is given for a dry bolt.

The only place to put a small amount of grease is on the wheel rim
centring ring, they usually don't even do this at the factory. In your first picture where the rust is, after you have cleaned it off.

According to the ERWIN doc. running gear, axels, steering page 182

Never treat wheel securing bolts with lubricant or corrosion protection materials.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,100 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The torque figure 120Nm is given for a dry bolt.

The only place to put a small amount of grease is on the wheel rim centring ring, they usually don't even do this at the factory. In your first picture where the rust is, after you have cleaned it off.

According to the ERWIN doc. running gear, axels, steering page 182

Never treat wheel securing bolts with lubricant or corrosion protection materials.
Sorry whats ERWIN Doc?

How can the torque setting be guaranteed with a dry bolt or stud, it?s been my understanding for many years a dry tread causes galling and spurious torque reading as a result.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
189 Posts
erWin is the Electronic Repair and Workshop
Information service from Volkswagen AG for independent garages, vehicle
fleets and all other companies which undertake professional level repairs and
servicing to Volkswagen cars. erWin also is available to private persons who
want to repair their Volkswagen vehicle themselves.

url https://erwin.volkswagen.de/erwin/showHome.do

You subscribe to each document you want to download.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
He is right, I saw mention of this in my GTi's manual, under the section about changing wheels. Although I'd agree if it were me I'd use some copper grease.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,396 Posts
Just like to say bolts should be fitted dry. NO grease.
Quite correct. Just swapped my wheels, fronts to backs. Had to assist removal with a mallet, as they had seized onto the centre spigot. Cleaned and copper greased the spigots, but just cleaned the bolts, then fitted and torqued to 80 ft lb, dry. This procedure was endorsed by my son, who is a Mercedes tech.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
894 Posts
Derv Burner: Nice DIY photo run makes forum more interesting.

Notice you are using the stock VAG locking nut. Apparently there are only 8 different keys so I would recommend some McGard locking nuts as an ' investment ' to protect the expensive wheels/ tyres.

It was the first thing I did on taking delivery. [Y]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,100 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Derv Burner: Nice DIY photo run makes forum more interesting.

Notice you are using the stock VAG locking nut. Apparently there are only 8 different keys so I would recommend some McGard locking nuts as an ' investment ' to protect the expensive wheels/ tyres.

It was the first thing I did on taking delivery. [Y]
Thanks Med, good advice , your right I do need to invest in a set, do you know the part number by chance.?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
894 Posts
Yes, McGard Part No 28018SL.

This version fits MkV GTi & has a revolving sleeve end to make it more difficult to use special 'gear' to remove the locking nut.

Ordered mine through Halfords as a ' special order ' about ?32 a set IIRC. ( quite quick on getting from their supplier)

I think they keep stock on the shelf of the standard ones without the revolving sleeve.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,100 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Yes, McGard Part No 28018SL.

This version fits MkV GTi & has a revolving sleeve end to make it more difficult to use special 'gear' to remove the locking nut.

Ordered mine through Halfords as a ' special order ' about ?32 a set IIRC. ( quite quick on getting from their supplier)

I think they keep stock on the shelf of the standard ones without the revolving sleeve.
Thanks very much Med, much appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,396 Posts
Do you or your son know if there is a reason they suggest not to use grease?
As silver38 says earlier, the torque values given are for dry bolts. The value for lubed bolts would be much higher, to give the same resistance to loosening. This resistance is only provided by the physics of the thread form - no locking washer or compound. In truth, there is probably enough leeway with a lubed bolt, but dry assembly is the recommended system.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,478 Posts
Do you or your son know if there is a reason they suggest not to use grease?
As silver38 says earlier, the torque values given are for dry bolts. The value for lubed bolts would be much higher, to give the same resistance to loosening. This resistance is only provided by the physics of the thread form - no locking washer or compound. In truth, there is probably enough leeway with a lubed bolt, but dry assembly is the recommended system.
Personally, I would clean the threads and then spray them with WD40 and let them 'dry out' before assembly as this would be a better solution to the problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,100 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Ergh @ Copper grease, its messy + plasters everywhere , looks a bodge. Id invest in some clear grease.[Y]
The melting point of clear grease is too low.as hub temps rise the clear grease could spin all over the place,maybe on your brake disc's.
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
Top