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I have driven both (not back to back though) the 2.0 feels obviously quicker, and dosnt seem to run out of power as quickly as the 1.9

Smoothness i cant really compare as it was about 6months between driving the two!
 

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I can't compare the two directly as I have never driven a MkV 1.9, BUT, I have a Bora 1.9 130, and a MkV GT TDI. Don't drive the Bora much now, but when I do, I notice that power delivery is completely different - it is quite 'flat' then has a large kick about 2000 rpm - 3500 rpm and then it drops off again rapidly, and runs out of energy, requiring you to change gear sooner. The 2.0 16v engine in the MkV is so much smoother in its power delivery - pulls all the way up to the red line from about 1500 rpm, with no real sudden urges, just smooth power [:D]. The 2.0 is quicker, but the 1.9 130 sometimes feels quicker because of the sudden punch that you get (can't comment on the 1.9 105 though!)

HTH

Al
 

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I've had a 150PD and a 20Tdi and still have regular use of the wifes company 1.9 130bhp tdi. The 2.0tdi tends to feel a lot more petrol like in its power delivery with a more constant torque spread maybe due to it being a 16V as opposed to the 8V in the the 1.9. If buying a mark V I would definetly opt for 2.0tdi which would be worth the extra premium due to 2 factors, 1) More power, 2) Newer engine design. - But having said that general opinion seesm to be that the 1.9 is slightly more fuel effiecient and I actually liked the all or nothing power delivery so the best advice I would offer would be to take an extensive test drive in both models and make your decision from there [:|]
 

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I've not driven the 2.0, but I'm very happy with my 1.9. Considering it's only 105ps I'm very surprised with the amount of torque there is and it's pretty smooth up through the gears. In 6th on the motorway it'll quite happily accelerate from 60-80 without any fuss.

If I had the choice now I'd be going for the 2.0 - mainly for the extra grin factor [:)]
 

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I have the 1.9 with DSG and am more than happy with it. I never
think of it as sluggish when I drive, wether its motorway cruising or
on the A roads... but then again I had a 1.8 Passat Auto before
this, and that did feel slow. When I booked a test drive, I
was sent a 2.0 TDi DSG for 3 days, and it did feel much quicker, but I
still opted for the 1.9 having never driven one. I did start to
get nervous as delivery date got near, hoping I wouldnt be disappointed
with the performance.

I'm not................. its not exactly a rocket, but more than adequate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I'm not sure that the 2.0 TDI is any less efficient than the 1.9 in terms of fuel consumption. The figures quoted by VW I think are pretty much the same.

It sounds like the older 130/140+ bhp versions of the 1.9 TDI are a bit "boosty" but I've never found the 1.9 (105bhp) to be like that. It too feels very smooth although I admit it doesn't want to rev much past 4,500 rpm. I believe that's because it's an 8 valve unit compared with the 2.0 litre's 16.

Thanks for people's replies. Just wanted to check. Maybe one day I'll get to compare my 1.9 with a 2.0 for myself. In the meantime, I think the 1.9 TDI Mk V is a great car, cheaper than the 2.0 and only insurance group 6 rather than 13.

Stuart
http://www.stuartdalby.co.uk/vwgolfmk5
 

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You're right that the red line is at about 4,500 rpm but that doesn't mean it can't go above it. It does struggle though but it's not going to do any harm so long as you don't leave the revs there.

At what rpm is the red line on the 2.0 TDI's?
The owners handbook says "The start of the red zone indicates the maximum engine speed which may be used briefly when the engine is warm and after it has been run in properly. However, it is advisable to change up a gear or lift your foot off the accelerator before the needle reaches the red zone".

In my opinion, stay out of it, but its your engine and the decison is obviously yours to operate the car how you see fit. The 2.0 TD also red lines at 4,500 rpm.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The owners handbook says "The start of the red zone indicates the maximum engine speed which may be used briefly when the engine is warm and after it has been run in properly. However, it is advisable to change up a gear or lift your foot off the accelerator before the needle reaches the red zone".
Yeah I'd agree with that for normal driving situations.

In my opinion, stay out of it, but its your engine and the decison is obviously yours to operate the car how you see fit.
I'm a firm believer in giving an engine a good work out occasionally and for that I usually like to take the revs into the red region.

The 2.0 TD also red lines at 4,500 rpm.
Surprised about the 4,500rpm red line on the 2.0 TDI's though. I'd heard a lot about the 2.0's being more "free-revving" and "petrol-like" and therefore just assumed the red line would be higher. Maybe the engines are capable of revving a bit more but VW just don't bother using a different rev counter.

Stuart
http://www.stuartdalby.co.uk/vwgolfmk5
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The owners handbook says "The start of the red zone indicates the maximum engine speed which may be used briefly when the engine is warm and after it has been run in properly. However, it is advisable to change up a gear or lift your foot off the accelerator before the needle reaches the red zone".
Yeah I'd agree with that for normal driving situations.

In my opinion, stay out of it, but its your engine and the decison is obviously yours to operate the car how you see fit.
I'm a firm believer in giving an engine a good work out occasionally and for that I usually like to take the revs into the red region.

The 2.0 TD also red lines at 4,500 rpm.
Surprised about the 4,500rpm red line on the 2.0 TDI's though. I'd heard a lot about the 2.0's being more "free-revving" and "petrol-like" and therefore just assumed the red line would be higher. Maybe the engines are capable of revving a bit more but VW just don't bother using a different rev counter.

Stuart
http://www.stuartdalby.co.uk/vwgolfmk5
 

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The 2.0 TD also red lines at 4,500 rpm.
Surprised about the 4,500rpm red line on the 2.0 TDI's though. I'd heard a lot about the 2.0's being more "free-revving" and "petrol-like" and therefore just assumed the red line would be higher. Maybe the engines are capable of revving a bit more but VW just don't bother using a different rev counter.
That doesnt mean they rev any higher, it means the engine pulls more up to the red line, feels more willing to rev rather than the 1.9 which seems to run out of puff more quickly
 

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No dought someboby knows the answer to this question.

Does the gttdi have a rev limiter on, as i have'nt had the ole girl in the red yet?

If they have limits on them you would'nt of thought it would do any harm to red line it now and again!!
 

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Hello,

I'll concur with aeg.

I have a Bora PD130 and have experince of the 2.0 140bhp engine in an A4.

The 140bhp engine is much easier to drive as the power delivery is more
predictable, i.e. rather more non-turbo like. The PD130 engine feels faster because of that surge in power from ~1500rpm.

I enjoy driving the PD130: the power delivery is great when overtaking,
whilst my partner prefers the 140bhp engine because she doesn't have to
take into account the sudden increase in power when accelerating - this
makes it for an easier drive, especially around town.

HTH
 

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I have the 2.0 TDI in DSG guise.. The Red Line is at 4500 rpm & goes through to 6000.

I've only had my car a week (from brand new) so don't ask me to see what happens! But can report what the dealers say.

They told me to:
For the first 1000 miles to keep the revs below 3000.
Avoid kicking down or towing.
They also said the engine on average could consume up to a litre of oil within the first 1000 miles!

I've also noticed whilst in general driving the DSG box wants to change up when the revs hit 2000. & if you press down 'hardish' it will kick down & push the engine up to around 3500rpm before changing up a gear. It's really smooth though & not like a kick down in a standard auto.. The engine pulls relentless.

In general.. The diesel engine is designed to provide low down grunt (Torque = Pulling power). over-revving them yields little advantage, in the long term can prove to put stress on the engine & fuel efficiency.

Anyone see that Top Gear episode where Clarkson went from London to Edinburgh in an Audi A8 TDI?
On one tank of fuel!!
I remember he rarely pushed the engine over 1200 rpm.
 

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The owners handbook says "The start of the red zone indicates the maximum engine speed which may be used briefly when the engine is warm and after it has been run in properly. However, it is advisable to change up a gear or lift your foot off the accelerator before the needle reaches the red zone".
Yeah I'd agree with that for normal driving situations.

In my opinion, stay out of it, but its your engine and the decison is obviously yours to operate the car how you see fit.
I'm a firm believer in giving an engine a good work out occasionally and for that I usually like to take the revs into the red region.

The 2.0 TD also red lines at 4,500 rpm.
Surprised about the 4,500rpm red line on the 2.0 TDI's though. I'd heard a lot about the 2.0's being more "free-revving" and "petrol-like" and therefore just assumed the red line would be higher. Maybe the engines are capable of revving a bit more but VW just don't bother using a different rev counter.

Stuart
http://www.radox.freeserve.co.uk/vwgolfmk5.htm
bit late to the table on this - 4500rpm doesnt give the engine a work out, 4500rpm is nothing on the rods and pistons. But what you are doing is putting huge demands on the injection system that is having to inject more fuel inot the engine in a decreasing amount of time - this is why diesels cant rev high because the required fuel pressure is enormous to meet the airflow demands and maintain the correct air/fuel ratio. Fuel system probles are the cause of many diesel engine problems, take my advice and dont abuse it.

rich
 

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I have driven lots of 'Standard' powered diesel engines around the 100 to 115 bhp mark from various manufacturers.

These cars are great for motorway cruising and the occasional sprint when required.

However, the 138 bhp 2.0 TDi engine of the Golf is something special. It actually feels more like a sports car. Great fun.

If you have the cash for the 2.0 over the 1.9, I personaly would go for it. For comfortable long distance cruising, you might consider the 1.9 as you get standard seats (more spongey- less body-gripping) and cruise control (NOT standard on 2.0 GT TDI) BUT..

For grin factor and the crazy torque, I would go for the 2.0 GT. Just make sure you dont loose your license as you can reash stuipd speeds on the motorway without realising it! Better still.. hold on to your cash and wait for the new GT TDI (170 PS!!!!!!!!!!)

Either way- Drive and be happy!!!!!
 
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